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Posts Tagged ‘Nook’

eBook pricing has been in the news a lot lately, because the Department of Justice is investigating the Big 6 and Apple for price fixing.

Right now we have the Agency model where publishers get to set the prices for their eBooks and they’ve set them quite unrealistically to try to hold on to their print sales.  First, one could easily argue that a high eBook price isn’t exactly going to drive a Kindle or Nook user to go buy the print version.  It’s actually driving them to buy a less expensive eBooks.  Which is good news for indie authors like us.  For example, at one point in Men’s Adventure on Kindle, Steve Berry was #1, I was #2 and #3, then there there were two Clive Cussler titles, then I was #6.  So 50% of the top six books in that genre were mine in that snapshot a little back.  In War, I have 11 of the top 50, more than W.E.B. Griffin, one of the masters of that genre.  I have two of the top ten science fiction sellers on both US and UK Kindle (Area 51 and Atlantis).  I submit it’s not necessarily that my books are so great but also an issue of pricing.  At $2.99 to $4.99 , I think my books look a lot more attractive than a $14.99 book from some trad author.

I’ve previously pointed out how pricing an eBook over $10 makes no sense financially.  Frankly, I’m of the opinion that pricing an eBook over $5 isn’t that great and at Who Dares Wins Publishing we recently reduced prices on all our titles to under $5, including our nonfiction.

On the other end of the spectrum is the uproar over the .99 eBook.  John Locke has made a lot of headlines for his savvy move of selling over one million eBooks, except all are priced at .99 except for his book about selling one million eBooks which is $4.99.  I kind of love the logic there.  But I’ve also pointed out that one million eBooks at .99 equals 166,000 eBooks at $2.99, which several indies, myself included, have achieved with much less fanfare.

The big cloud I’m seeing on the horizon is the growing awareness in NY that they need to revise the way they view the eBook.  It’s not competition for their print sales, it’s part of their overall revenue stream.  I predict we will see a lot more books from the Big 6 priced under $5 in the coming year.  I think there will be more direct to eBook publishing, where the book might never even come out in print.

What does this mean?  The playing field is going to level out.  New York is going to get leaner and more efficient and embrace the eBook instead of viewing it as the enemy.  Indie authors are going to have to work harder to keep their readers and also consider, if successful, what to do when NY or Amazon or whoever comes calling with offers.

The biggest thing all writers—trad, indie, hybrid—need to realize is that there is no one ‘right’ path to Oz.  In fact, we’re all starting from different places, not necessarily all from Kansas, and Oz might even mean different things to each of us.  To each their own, but the ones who succeed will be the ones who keep their options open and constantly educate themselves on the business and also are able to act decisively.

The bottom line is that you, the reader, will vote with your wallet.

Readers Rule!

 

 

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Please welcome Colin Falconer to Readers Rule!

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I was seven years old when my Aunty Ivy came to visit us. I got a bristly kiss on the cheek, was complimented on my curly hair, and handed a bag full of comics.

It was the start of a lifelong love affair – with stories.

There were some Superman comics in the bag, but they were promptly discarded in favour of the half dozen dog-eared Classics Illustrated. Every week after that, when Aunty Ivy took the train down from London to see us in (what was then) rural Essex, she added to my library of the world’s greatest literature, each volume condensed into 52 lurid pages with speak bubbles.

By the time I was eight I had read Moby Dick, Doctor Jekyl and Mister Hyde, The Moonstone, The Black Tulip and Ivanhoe; was familiar with most of the major works of Alexandre Dumas (Père), Mark Twain and William Wilkie Collins; and had even read most of Homer’s Odyssey (although I never found out how it ended because the comics were second hand and the last page had been ripped out.)

I just hope he got back home all right.

I was the only eight year old I knew who preferred Michael Stroganoff to Huckleberry Hound. All right, so I thought Faust was the Incredible Hulk’s younger brother, but what those comic books gave me was a thirst for great stories.

When I left school the first thing I did, to the consternation of both my parents, was go hitch-hiking around Europe. After all, why go to university? I’d read everything Shakespeare ever wrote one wet weekend when I was 9. What was left to learn?

Instead I hitch-hiked to Morocco, where me and my mate were the only white faces (then) wandering the Djema El-fna’a, the Place of the Dead, in Marrakech. Not too long after that I found myself on a rusted freighter in the middle of a typhoon in the South Java Sea, then heading to the Golden Triangle in Burma, where I shook hands with CIA agents and drug smugglers.

My travels in Indochina led to my first novel, based loosely on the life of Charles Sobrajh, a serial killer whose path I almost crossed many times. They were also the source of my five book Opium series, based on the growth of the heroin trade.

Shadows moving behind the fretted windows of a Marrakech palace led to my fascination with Muslim culture and to books like HAREM and SERAGLIO.

Yet when I look back on the beginnings of my writing career, I still wish I had paid more attention to staying in genre. Pick your niche and stick to it, as Bob Mayer says. Like Grisham or Clancy or Picoult.

But at the start I was too naïve to realize that I was writing out of genre. For a kid raised on Classics Illustrated the only genre I understood was a great story written in an accessible way. I leaned towards historical backgrounds because the Classics Illustrated stories were mostly that.

I try to pay more attention to genre these days, because readers certainly do. But in my own mind I have never strayed from my domain, one you won’t find in the writing books. It is the Aunty Ivy genre; I pray at the feet of the genius who sandwiched Les Miserables into forty eight garish pages.

I don’t have genius. All I have is a love affair with a big story on an exotic canvas that someone can read on one rainy afternoon, just like I did. If just one of my stories can fire someone else’s imagination and send their lives on a different course, as happened to me, then Aunty Ivy and I will consider it a job well done.

 

Check out Colin’s latest release, Venom at Barnes and Noble Nook First!

Buy at Barnes and Noble

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HEARTBREAKER, the 3rd book in my four-book Warrior Series, is now live at Amazon Kindle and B&N Nook.  It will soon pop up at the Apple iBookstore and various other e-bookstore venues.   Yep, I am one happy camper!

I have a deep and abiding respect for the military family, the high standards pursued by its men and women, and their willingness to make the sacrifices necessary for the greater good, so it won’t surprise you that I’ve penned several romantic suspense novels to celebrate these modern day warriors.  As well, I wanted to celebrate the unique women who embrace these men and their often challenging lifestyles.

You may not know that my late father was a career aviator in the U.S. Air Force.  I grew up as an Air Force brat, and I’m proud of the experience.  Yes, the person in uniform is the one who “serves”, but I know from personal experience that the families of these men and women provide the foundation of stability and love to which each warrior returns – at the end of the day or at the end of a tour of duty in a warzone far from home.  Life as an Air Force brat gave me an instinctive grasp of both commitment and community at an early age, taught me to be a team player, and inspired a level of idealism that has always fueled my story concepts as a romantic suspense writer.

Each hero and heroine in the 4-book Warrior Series possesses an amalgam of the personalities and character traits of the men and women I’ve known as the daughter of a career Air Force aviator and as the wife of a military aviator – men and women I will admire until I draw my last breath.  Some of those men and women have already made the ultimate sacrifice, but many more still populate the landscape of my life – and for that blessing, I am deeply grateful.

Last week, HEARTBREAKER joined DESERT ROSE and MIDNIGHT STORM at the Nook and Kindle e-bookstores.  At the end of February, MORE THAN FRIENDS, the 4th book in the Warrior Series, will be available to readers.  My personal hope is that you all will enjoy each book in the Warrior Series.  (The price point for each book:  $1.99.)

More good news: INTIMATE STRANGERS, already downloaded by 80,000 plus readers as of this writing, is a FREE download at Amazon Kindle, the Apple iBookstore, and at Smashwords.  THANK YOU, Readers!

Drop in at Facebook or Google+ and “friend” or “encircle” me.  I love connecting with readers.

Hugs all around,  Laura

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